Bo Lo Bao (Pineapple Bun, 菠蘿包) – World Bread Day 2010

The most well-known bread of Hong Kong, Bo Lo Bao represents our food culture and how we interprets bread in this city. “Bo Lo” is the Cantonese of pineapple, wheareas “Bao” is bread. This bread features a golden pineapple-like pattern pastry on top, and therefore the name. Is there pineapple inside? No! It’s no surprise the name of Chinese food or dishes sometimes may be a metaphor of something else. The name “Mooncake” is one of the examples.

Bo Lo Bao is a product of “East meets West”. One common story about the origin was people wanted more from traditional western style buns, and hence used sugar, egg, shortening, flour etc and created a pastry for the top. This bread has a crispy top, soft crumb, golden color, enriched flavor and short fermentation time. It exactly tells our preference for a variety of characters in food at a quick speed. Because of the crispy crust and enriched flavor, this bread is also suitable to serve hot or warm. I do appreciate the creativeness and originality of this bread, and I like it when I want something savory. Notwithstanding our culture is used to have soft, warm and savory bread, it is not easy for people to pay more attention to an authentic sourdough. Um, let’s hope time will change this!

This Cantonese bread will go to the World Bread Day. I would also like to submit it to Yeastspotting. Enjoy! :)

Recipe (makes 6)

Sweet buns

Bread flour 200g

Sugar 53g

Instant yeast 8g

Milk powder 13g

Water 100g

Egg 23g

Shortening 23g

Salt 4g

Egg wash

Knead all above and ferment until double in size (about 45 mins). Divide in 6pcs and shape into buns. 2nd fermentation until double in size for about 45 mins

Crust topping

Cake flour 45g

Sugar 25g

Shortening 15g

Butter 3g

Egg 5g

Milk powder 5g

Baking ammonia 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking soda 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking powder 1/8 tp

Mix all of the above and divide into 6 portions. Shape into balls. Afer the 2nd fermentation of the sweet buns, use your palm or a chopper to press the topping into thin round slices. Size would be slightly bigger than the diameter of the dough (refer to photo). Place on the dough and brush with egg wash. Use a toothpick to make crisscrosses on the topping. Bake at 200C for 16-17 mins until the top becomes golden brown. Serve warm.

(Recipe and last photo adapted from the book “Hong Kong Memorable Bakery”/ “回憶的味道-港式老包餅” by 黎力強)

Stout, Oat and Honey Rolls

This is a recipe from Dan Lepard again. I love his recipes which are always unique, delicious and easy to make.

Dan has suggested shaping the doughs into knots in the recipe, but I’ve made them into rolls. I roughly followed the below bread site to shape the rolls. It’s in Japanese but has many photos to follow easily.

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/tableroll/tableroll2.htm

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/recipe/recipe.htm

I’ve made half of the recipe which gave 6 bread rolls (80g each).  They were baked at 180C for 18 minutes.

I especially like the unique and strong flavor of the stout in the rolls. The bread is also sweet because of the alcohol and honey. It’s soft and has some bites of the oats as well… :) I will make this again, and would like to submit this post to Susan’s YeastSpotting. Happy baking!

Spiced Stout Buns

There are stout, black tea and rum in this bread. I served it warm and the alcohol flavor was so strong! Love it.There are also grounded ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, orange peel, lemon peel and dried raisins in this bread. All resulted in an intense flavor.

I could not find Mackeson Milk Stout and hence have used another stout to replace it. There was rum in this bread because I used dried fruits and peels that I have soaked in rum for months. When I ate the bread cold the alcohol flavor in the fruits was still strong.

For the cross, I used only flour to mix with water this time, but I think that the one having oil, flour and water from Jeffrey Hamelman’s recipe gives better result.

Compared with Hamelman’s hot cross buns, this one has personality, the crumb also has sweetness from the stout, while Hamalman’s has a lot of fruits and is “fluffy” in texture.

Jeffrey Hamelman’s Hot Cross Buns:

http://baobread.wordpress.com/2008/07/10/hot-cross-buns/

Dan Lepard’s another Hot Cross Buns:

http://baobread.wordpress.com/2009/04/13/hot-cross-buns-ii/

Spiced Stout Bun Recipe:

http://www.danlepard.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2799

Orange and Mint Loaf

This is a delicious loaf from a recipe by Richard Bertinet. The crumb is very soft and moist, enriched, and has a hint of refreshing orange and mint flavor. Before making it I wondered if bread with mint would taste good. Now I found that the mint has merged with the orange nicely, and goes very well with the bread. The taste is refreshing. I like it. It’s suitable for summer.

Yea, summer has come. I want to make more soft bread or breads with fruits in the coming days. Something more citrus, appetizing and colorful. : )

Love these little cuts on the crust.

Tender!

Recipe adapted the book “Dough” by Richard Bertinet. For steps please follow Gourmet.com .

Makes 1 loaf

Basic Sweet dough

125g full fat milk

7g commercial yeast

250g strong bread flour

30g unsalted butter at room temperature

20g caster sugar

5g salt

1 large egg

Addition

1/2 brunch of fresh mint (I used 3 sprigs)

Zest of 1 large orange

1/2 tablespoon Cointreau

1/2 egg beaten with a pinch of salt for an egg wash

Flour for dusting

A little butter for greasing

Hot Cross Buns II

Dan Lepard’s recipe. The dough was really easy to work with (no need to knead, just fold 12-14 times after overnight fermentation, as most gluten is developed after fermenting overnight). Believe many people can make it. The bread is really really soft. Delicious & worthwhile to try! I would like it spicier (as always), and will add more spices next time. Happy Spring! :)

Very wet dough. But it’ll be fine after overnight. The wet dough is to facilitate gluten development during overnight fermentation.

Walnut and Red Wine Bread

This is a direct dough, using few ingredients, easy to make, but has a great flavor. It is Dan Lepard’s “Simple Walnut Tin Loaf”, and I bake it on hearth instead (200C for 20mins, each dough weighs 160g). The crust is cripsy, and the crumb is very tender and moist. There are many walnuts in this bread, and the walnut flavor dominates. There is 42% red wine in the dough, but it doesn’t taste strong after baking, the taste is subtle instead. I like this combination of red wine, wheat & walnut. Inspiring & good. :)

Liquid mixture: walnut, red wine, oil & water. Looks purple.

Recipe: from Dan Lepard’s Forum or The Guardian

Coffee Coconut Swirl Bread

Finally I have time to make bread, and this bread came up to my mind immediately. Um, it must be one of my favourites. :)

Besides Bo Lo Bao and Cocktail Bun, which are still the two most popular buns in Hong Kong, this bread is also a specialty here. However, it is not easy to find now as I guess not many people like coffee flavoredbakery foods.

Notwithstanding I still think this bread is tasteful and worthwhile to try. The coffee marries with the coconut very well. This bread is also easy to make. It is a white bread dough, plus a filling made of coffee, coconut, butter and sugar.

The white bread recipe is from Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”. It is a soft and tasty dough and I use it as the basic dough for many other breads. The filling is created by myself.

As you see in the photos, the bread is highlighted with a moist filling. So pull apart the swirls with your fingers and enjoy! I’m sure you’ll enjoy the moist and fragrance of the filling with the loaf. :)

White Bread (Adapted from Page43 of Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”

Bread Flour 350g

Salt 7g

Sugar 28g

Powdered Milk 21g

Instant Yeast 3g

Egg 14g

Shortening 28g

Water 203g

Mix, knead & ferment the dough as other common straight doughs. To make the swirl, after 1st fermentation, roll the dough to 8inches x 5inches. Sprinkle & slightly press the filling to the dough. Roll tight & seam. Bake at 180C for 40mins (rotate half way) after 2nd fermentation (I think the bread is a bit dry this time with my oven, I’ll try to bake 5mins less next time).

Filling (mix together)

Unsalted Butter 24g

Egg 24g

Shredded Coconut 48g

Sugar 40g

Instant Coffee Powder 1 1/4 tps (dissolve with few drops of hot water)

Soya and Linseed Loaf

This recipe is from Dan Lepard. The bread doesn’t contain any egg, butter or milk products, but stays soft & moist for days because of the soya protein in the soy milk. You may see Dan’s reply here.

I used King Arthur All Purpose Flour and rye flour from a local shop to prepare the dough. The dough was quite sticky at the beginning, but after using Dan’s first fermentation method, gluten was formed like usual easily. The resulted crumb of the bread was soft but a bit chewy.

I could not taste the soy milk flavor in the bread, and the taste was similar to light wheat bread. There was also linseed in every bite. Crust was a bit thicker than usual. Overall, I like this healthy loaf and will make again. :)

Recipe: In Dan Lepard’s Forum or the Guardian

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