2 Sourdoughs with Amaranth Flour

Been making sourdoughs with amaranth flour too. The one in batard shape was made with 25% white starter (100% hydration), 10% amaranth flour and 65% overall hydration. The other one was made with 33% white starter (100% hydration), 5% amaranth and same overall hydration. Both were retarded in fridge overnight. I like amaranth mainly because it gives a more reddish color to the bread. Also there was study saying it can keep the bread moist. Amaranth flour alone has a grassy smell but it wasn’t tasted in my finished bread. Both bread tasted quite good ..

Submitted to Yeastspotting

Levain with Whole Wheat, Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth

Levain with Whole Wheat (Left) Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth (Right)

The Pain au Levain with Whole Wheat Flour is from Jeffrey Hamelman’s recipe. I retarded it overnight and the taste was really good, sweet and strong in wheat flavor. I also experimented by substituting 5% of the whole wheat flour with amaranth flour. It was prepared in the same condition – same retardation, fermentation hours, both bread baked together. Interesting finding was the whole wheat and amaranth bread was a bit gummy in texture (crumb & crust), also the taste was not as sweet as with whole wheat flour alone. Gosh seems whole wheat and amaranth cannot be a couple now? Maybe give them some time and let me try to experiment more first..

Submitted to Yeastspotting

Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth

Levain with Whole Wheat Flour (Jeffrey Hamelman recipe)

Levain with Whole Wheat, photo shot under sunlight

Experiments – Overnight Retardation for Different Sourdoughs

Light Spelt Sourdough with Assorted Nuts and Raisins (Overnight Retarded)

Sourdough making is now even simpler and time saving for me. Recently I’ve been experimenting retarding different sourdoughs overnight and baking the other day, so that I don’t have to wait till weekend and spend half a day in making a bread. I have tried retarding sourdoughs with different flours, amaranth, whole wheat and spelt, which you’ll see in coming posts, I would say that those with amaranth and whole wheat tasted great, but for spelt it seemed its flavor was lost after retarding. They were not as sweet and the spelt flavor was not as strong as spelt sourdoughs I made in the same day. Of course these were my findings from 3 spelt sourdoughs only, but for sure not all breads are suitable for retarding overnight which I read the same from Hamelman’s book from the Levain section. More overnight retardation findings to come, stay tuned. :)

Spelt Sourdough with Chia Seeds (50% spelt, 75% hydration, 3% chia seeds, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough (70% whole wheat, 30% spelt, 75% hydration, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough Crumb

Sourdough with Amaranth Flour

A sourdough with 13.5% of amaranth flour (to all flour) added to the final dough. Overall hydration is 68%. The bread this time darkened even more quickly compared with the amaranth sourdough that I made before which the overall amaranth was about 9%. I covered the crust with aluminum foil in the midway to avoid the crust getting burnt before the crumb was fully baked. Texture with the increased amaranth flour was also not as chewy as last time as well. I still love the beautiful reddish brown color that the amaranth flour gives to the crust.. :-) Now I’m thinking of other bread recipes with amaranth flour for next time. Any good ideas? :-)

Recipe

Bread Flour 212.5g 85%
Amaranth Flour 37.5g 15%
Water 163g 65%
Salt 5g 2%
Starter (100% Hydration with Bread Flour) 50g 20%

220C for 15 mins. Then lower to 200C for another 20 mins.

Love the Blister ~

Amaranth Sourdough

I love playing around with different grains. When I saw the Amaranth Flour from Bob’s Red Mill in the supermarket, I bought it without hesitation. There was very little information about amaranth flour in my bread books on hand. Luckily I found a formula on whole grain sourdough in MC’s blog. MC is a devoted blogger on bread who shares so much information about her SFBI workshops and passionately visited and introduced to us different bread bakers in her blog where I’ve learnt a lot. Do visit her site (though I guess many of you already know her). :)

 

Back to amaranth flour. It is gluten-free as it is not wheat and is produced from amaranth grain. It has a  smell of grass and raw carrots. The formula in MC’s blog was suggested by Safa Hamzé who was the instructor the SFBI workshop and has developed techniques working with whole grains. You can find some of the information in an article in “Whole Grain Mania” in Baking Management.

Hence this bread is made of 20% amaranth starter. The starter smelt less “grassy” when ripen but did not smell as sweet as starter made of wheat.There was no amaranth flour in the final dough and so overall amaranth flour was abot 9%. When baking the bread gained color pretty quickly and turned into beautiful reddish-brown. Safa mentioned in the Baking Management article that amaranth kept moisture well which I agree from my result this time. The crumb of my bread was nicely moist and did not stale as quickly on the next day. The crumb was also open and color was yellower. However I could not taste the slight lactic flavor as mentioned in the article. I could not taste the “grassy” flavor from the amaranth neither.

I am happy with the result of this time and agree with Safa that bakers can consider adding amaranth flour to their breads in order to help extending shelf life of the bread. Safa has suggested overall gluten free flour should remain under 15% in overall formulation,  and I will try playing around with 15% of amaranth flour next time.

This bread will be submitted to Yeastspotting. Let me know if you have more ideas or other information about amaranth or whole grain sourdough. :)

Recipe:

Bread flour 250g 100%
Water 163g 65%
Salt 5.5g (approx) 2.2%
Amaranth Starter (100% hydration) 50g 20%
Instant Yeast 1/8 tp (approx) 0.2%

*I baked at 220C for first 25mins, the bread gained much color that time. Then I lowered to 200C for another 10mins, and kept the bread in oven for another 5 mins with oven turned off.

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