World Bread Day 2013 — A Quick Garlic Tomato Focaccia

Didn’t post for long! But I’ll not forget to celebrate the World Bread Day every Oct 16 with all bread lovers. <3

Thanks http://www.kochtopf.me for hosting this for the 8th year!! Awesome :)

Here’s my submission — A quick garlic tomato focaccia which is really simple, but colorful and tasty :)

It’s simply an overnight bread dough from my fridge, made into a Focaccia with toppings also from my fridge (cherry tomatoes, garlic, bacon and Pecorino). Bread dough is Richard Bertinet’s Olive Oil Dough recipe. It’s really simple and quick to do but tasteful as the dough has been fermented overnight. My way is to add lots of olive oil on baking tray and top of Focaccia dough before adding toppings, the oil will make the bread really crispy outside and maintain soft inside. Love it! <3

Bread is really simple to make and enjoyable… so make more real bread, eat more real bread. Happy World Bread Day!

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughGarlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughIMG_5387
Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

World Bread Day 2012 – Cantonese Salty Rolls (咸卷)

World Bread Day 2012 - 7th edition! Bake loaf of bread on October 16 and blog about it!I was thinking what sourdough I would like to bake to participate in the World Bread Day today, and I finally determined to bake these Salty Rolls (咸卷) instead. Besides Bo Lo Bao and Cocktail Buns, these bread rolls are also one of the several iconic breads in Hong Kong, and you can easily find them in Hong Kong’s local bakeries or Cha Chaan Teng. As the name goes they are more salty and buttery in taste. I’m thinking they are possibly adapted from Western white bread/roll formulas and re-formulated according to our local taste.

They also have other names including 軟豬仔包 (soft piggy rolls?) and 芝麻卷 (sesame rolls). Below is a recipe I learnt from a Cantonese bread class few years back. Have a try and let me know if you like them. Happy World Bread Day! :)

Recipe (makes 6)

Bread flour 200g 100%
Water 130g 65%
Butter 20g 10%
Sugar 10g 5%
Milk powder 6g 3%
Salt 4g 2%
Yeast 3g 1.5%
Egg wash (optional, I have skipped in mine)
White sesames (optional, for sprinkling on top)

1) Mix the ingredients and knead the dough until full gluten development.

2) 1st fermentation until double in size (1-1.5hr)

3) Form into 6 rolls

4) 2nd fermentation until double in size (1hr)

5) Brush the rolls with some water or egg wash, sprinkle the sesame seeds

6) Bake at 180C for 15 mins, serve warm

66 Percent Sourdough Rye

ImageJeffrey Hamelman’s Recipe. Rye starter has a strong smell of bread and my boyfriend asked whether I was baking bread when the starter was fermenting (not even baking). I only kneaded the dough 10 times with three 10-minute rest, then had first fermentation for 30min. The dough had little strength even after the first fermentation. Due to the hot weather in Hong Kong, it only had 20-30min 2nd proof which was shorter than the recipe indicated (50-60min). Most flavor of this bread comes from the rye starter.

The bread has to be waited for 24hrs before cut to stabilize the crumb and develop flavor. I put it under room temperature for the first 24 hrs wrapped with linen, and put it in fridge wrapped with parchment paper for the next day as Hong Kong’s humid and hot so I tried to avoid mold on it.

I love the taste of this bread, moist, mildly sour, mild taste of rye, and the crumb didn’t feel crumbly even the dough didn’t have much strength (I used Doves Farm Rye flour). It’s an easy going rye bread and I know it’s happy with my blue cheese.

Image

Image

Image

2 Sourdoughs with Amaranth Flour

Been making sourdoughs with amaranth flour too. The one in batard shape was made with 25% white starter (100% hydration), 10% amaranth flour and 65% overall hydration. The other one was made with 33% white starter (100% hydration), 5% amaranth and same overall hydration. Both were retarded in fridge overnight. I like amaranth mainly because it gives a more reddish color to the bread. Also there was study saying it can keep the bread moist. Amaranth flour alone has a grassy smell but it wasn’t tasted in my finished bread. Both bread tasted quite good ..

Submitted to Yeastspotting

Levain with Whole Wheat, Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth

Levain with Whole Wheat (Left) Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth (Right)

The Pain au Levain with Whole Wheat Flour is from Jeffrey Hamelman’s recipe. I retarded it overnight and the taste was really good, sweet and strong in wheat flavor. I also experimented by substituting 5% of the whole wheat flour with amaranth flour. It was prepared in the same condition – same retardation, fermentation hours, both bread baked together. Interesting finding was the whole wheat and amaranth bread was a bit gummy in texture (crumb & crust), also the taste was not as sweet as with whole wheat flour alone. Gosh seems whole wheat and amaranth cannot be a couple now? Maybe give them some time and let me try to experiment more first..

Submitted to Yeastspotting

Levain with Whole Wheat & Amaranth

Levain with Whole Wheat Flour (Jeffrey Hamelman recipe)

Levain with Whole Wheat, photo shot under sunlight

Experiments – Overnight Retardation for Different Sourdoughs

Light Spelt Sourdough with Assorted Nuts and Raisins (Overnight Retarded)

Sourdough making is now even simpler and time saving for me. Recently I’ve been experimenting retarding different sourdoughs overnight and baking the other day, so that I don’t have to wait till weekend and spend half a day in making a bread. I have tried retarding sourdoughs with different flours, amaranth, whole wheat and spelt, which you’ll see in coming posts, I would say that those with amaranth and whole wheat tasted great, but for spelt it seemed its flavor was lost after retarding. They were not as sweet and the spelt flavor was not as strong as spelt sourdoughs I made in the same day. Of course these were my findings from 3 spelt sourdoughs only, but for sure not all breads are suitable for retarding overnight which I read the same from Hamelman’s book from the Levain section. More overnight retardation findings to come, stay tuned. :)

Spelt Sourdough with Chia Seeds (50% spelt, 75% hydration, 3% chia seeds, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough (70% whole wheat, 30% spelt, 75% hydration, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough Crumb

Bread that gives surprise – Salad hidden inside bread

Crack the crispy thin balls and salad springs out from inside – it’s a recipe from Richard Bertinet whereas the bread dough is rolled to very thin and bake on high heat so that the dough puffs up.

Guess how to hide the salad? Dig a small hole to place the salad veggie in, turn over the balls and serve. This will bring much happiness when the people crack the balls. The crisps adds textures to the greens too. :)

White Bread for Gathering

Made a white bread for gathering with friends. Recipe is from Peter Reinhart’s famous Bread Baker’s Apprentice. I’ve used a Japanese brand “Nisshin” bread flour which is popular among some local and Taiwanese bread bloggers. The flour is finely milled and hence the bread turns out very soft and silky.  Yummy :)

White Bread (Adapted from Page43 of Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”)

Bread Flour 350g

Salt 7g

Sugar 28g

Powdered Milk 21g

Instant Yeast 3g

Egg 14g

Shortening 28g

Water 203g

Bake at 180C

Levain with Light Muscovado Sugar and Nuts

The bread is made with 15% light muscovado sugar and 24% assorted nuts. The muscovado sugar not only gives the bread a soft and moist texture, but also added a fudge flavor which pairs very well with the natural sweetness of the dough.  Overall a savory, easy-going and popular bread among friends I would say. :)

Recipe

112g levain (100% hydration) 44.4%
188g bread flour 74.6%
64g whole wheat flour 25.4%
38g light muscovado sugar 15%
3g salt 3%
140g water 55.6%
60g assorted nuts (cashew , almond, walnut, macadamia) – slighted toasted 23.8%

First fermentation – 3 hours; Second fermentation – 45 mins (hot weather in HK..)

Bake at 230C for 10 mins, then 210C until done

Bake Again

Finally I bake again. I finally bought a new home oven which I thought would be great to help generate steam in the oven and make great bread. Now it seems I need to spend few more times with it to make better bread. The 2 sides of the crust in this bread is not as crusty and there could be more oven spring? Well it’s not a professional oven (and I’m not professional) after all. :P

Below is a simple levain with a hint of honey which I modified from a Japanese bread book. It’s 113g sourdough with 100% hydration, 250g flour, 105g water, 5g salt and 5g honey. Overall hydration is approximately 54% and flour is Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour. Clean flavor and stay moist on 2nd day. It reminds me of the good old baking times, and it’s always good to take a break and bake at home. Haha.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 69 other followers

%d bloggers like this: