Barley and Rye Bread

I forgot adding salt to the dough of this bread, haha. This was until the dough doubled so quickly during 1st fermentation, I suddenly remembered it! So I kneaded the salt into the dough immediately, and that was the time I really understood how the salt could increase the dough elasticity.

The dough without salt at the beginning was lack of gluten. I thought it was because of the rye and barley flour. However the gluten was much improved after I added the salt. Anyway, I let the dough rest for its final hour of fermentation. I’m not sure how this has affected my bread.

As Dan has suggested in the recipe, I toasted the barley flour before preparing the dough. I really love the nutty smell of it. Mmmmm :) Also a banneton is necessary for holding the dough in its final fermentation, as its strength is not as strong with the rye and barley flour in it. I could see “cracks” on the seam side after its final fermentation.

This is another tasty bread. I agree that the rye and barley have served as friendly background flavors. I also like the mild sourness. It started my week perfectly. :)

Recipe from: The Hand Made Loaf by Dan Lepard

Batard with Spelt

This bread smelt really sweet when taken out from the oven. I am happy that by adding 10%  spelt flour to the pre-ferment and final dough can result with a more delightful bread. Compared with rye and whole wheat, spelt can give a sweeter note to the bread and its wheat flavor is more easy going.

The gluten of spelt is weak, therefore I have only used 10% this time to give it a try. As water absorption of spelt is higher, I increased the hydration to 68%.  This bread is awesome and I will have more bread experiments with spelt soon. I will submit this bread to YeastSpotting. Have fun baking!

 

Recipe (Makes 1 big loaf)

Biga
1/12tp instant yeast
70g bread flour
10g spelt flour
60g water

Mix and leave in the fridge for overnight.

Final dough
220g bread flour
40g spelt flour
1g instant yeast
170g water
6g salt
All of the biga

1)Mix all the ingredients in a bowl, cover and rest for 10 minutes
2)Brush the working table with little olive oil, and knead the dough for 10-15 seconds. Return the dough to the bowl, cover and  rest for another 10 minutes
3)Brush the working table with oil again, and knead for another 10-15 seconds
4)First fermentation for 1.5 hrs (fold the dough once after 45 minutes)
5)Shape into batard, final fermentation for 1.5 hrs
6)Score the dough. Bake with steam at 240C for 10 minutes, then lower the heat to 220C and continue to bake for 30 minutes

Stout, Oat and Honey Rolls

This is a recipe from Dan Lepard again. I love his recipes which are always unique, delicious and easy to make.

Dan has suggested shaping the doughs into knots in the recipe, but I’ve made them into rolls. I roughly followed the below bread site to shape the rolls. It’s in Japanese but has many photos to follow easily.

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/tableroll/tableroll2.htm

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/recipe/recipe.htm

I’ve made half of the recipe which gave 6 bread rolls (80g each).  They were baked at 180C for 18 minutes.

I especially like the unique and strong flavor of the stout in the rolls. The bread is also sweet because of the alcohol and honey. It’s soft and has some bites of the oats as well… :) I will make this again, and would like to submit this post to Susan’s YeastSpotting. Happy baking!

Everything Bread

I don’t have time to bake very often and there are a number of grains and seeds in my kitchen going to expire now. There is also a 2-day old rye sourdough in the fridge. It smelt very sour. Therefore I made this bread in an attempt to clear these stuff, and the result is not bad!

The bread contains a soaker with sesame seeds, rolled oats, linseed, semolina and sunflower seeds. The soaker had a strong semolina flavor but the flavor was not noticable in the bread. Instead the bread has a stronger sesame flavor especially in the crust.

The most interesting thing is the bread is only mildly sour. Maybe I don’t have to throw out a 2-day old sourdough now. The bread is  mildly sweet because of the grains too. I quite enjoyed this bread, especially enjoyed throwing anything I have on hand to the bread and returned with pleasing result. :P

My recipe (600 g bread dough):

100% high gluten flour
20% rye sourdough (2-day old)
90% water (40% for soaking the seeds overnight with some salt added)
2% salt
1% instant yeast
30% seeds (sesame seeds, rolled oats, linseed, semolina, sunflower seeds)

Baked at 230C.

Mellow Bakers – Light Rye Bread

This is my light rye bread for the Mellow Bakers.

Some people do not like the caraway flavor in rye bread. The caraway in this bread is light. In addition to the thin crust, soft crumb and mild sour flavor, this rye bread is an easy-going one.

I could not find medium rye flour that the recipe called for. As a result I sifted half of the whole rye flour to substitute for the medium rye that the recipe suggested as an alternative, and saved the bran for the crust. Except this, the rest of the recipe was really easy to handle.

I enjoy making bread for the Mellow Bakers. I hope I’ll have time to bake more soon!

Mellow Bakers – Rustic Bread

This is my first contribution to Mellow Bakers. I like this forum where people can share their bread baking results by following recipes from the book “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman.

In this rustic bread, there is 10% rye, 10% wholemeal and 80% bread flour (I used King Arthur All Purpose). Hydration is 69% and the dough was pretty slack. I stopped kneading when it had medium gluten development and gave it 2 folds during the first fermentation instead.

However the dough was still too slack to make a shape except making it into a ciabatta. It spreaded out as well when removing from the couch to the baking tray. As a result the bread was resulted quite flat. I think I should use stronger flour next time!

The bread was baked at 450F for 38mins. Its taste was good with a complex flavor in the crumb and crust. Love it, except my skills in managing the dough strength is yet to be improved!

Update on Dec 11, 2010

I’ve always thought King Arthur’s All Purpose Flour can be used for bread as there was a baguette recipe on the back of its flour bag. Until a month ago I received an email reply from King Arthur as I asked them about the flour, I realized I should really use bread flour suggested in Jeffrey Hamelman’s book instead of AP, as AP is a soft flour. Now I know why my rustic bread turned flat!!

Soft Cheese Bread (from Artisan Bread Every Day)

This is the softest almost no knead bread I have ever tried. It stays soft on the 3rd day and tastes really good with the cheese and chives in it.

The no knead bread from other recipes I made before contained a high proportion of yesat, and hence the baked bread tasted really “yeasty”. Recipes in this Peter Reinhart’s new book used much less yeast, but 35C warm water to wake up the yeast prior to mixing with other ingredients. A really smart idea. I think this book should be more pronounced to home bakers to allow them to make great bread at home easily. :)

Recipe: Soft cheese bread from Peter Reinhart’s Artisan Bread Every Day

France’s Hottest Baker

He is smart to call bread “erotic” and “romantic”, isn’t it? Adding senses descriptions to market the breads. And he says at the same time, “bread is not just bread — not just something you put on the table to accompany your meal”. It’s clever to attract bread lovers at time. I am looking forward to trying his bread too. I hope they really taste good but are not some sensational marketing technique only. :-)

Gontran Cherrier’s interview in The Times UK:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/recipes/article7056870.ece

Potato Bread with Roasted Onions

I always want to try new recipe when I have time to bake, but I’ve made this bread from the recipe of Jeffrey Hamelman’s “Bread” for several times now, and highly recommend it. This bread is sooo delectable. It has a very strong roasted flavor, yet is sweet because of the roasted potatoes and caramelized onions. The potatoes have made the crumb tender and the dough less sticky to knead as well. I like the potato skins. They gave a “rugged” look and taste to the bread. I also made the other potato bread without the caramelized onions before, but this one with the onions is unbeatable. The caramel flavor made the bread much much more delicious..

Some notes about preparing the bread — I used Chinese potatoes to make this bread, which gives a stronger potato flavor than Yukon Gold that I have tried before. To prepare the potatoes I diced them with their skin on and baked at 180C until cooked, and then mashed them with a fork. For the onions I did not follow the recipe to bake them, I fried the onions with olive oil at medium heat until they were cameralized instead. The weight of the onions would reduce by almost half when they are done. Hence make sure to prepare double weight of the recipe indicated before cooking them. It is also important to make sure the water in the onions are mostly evaporated when cooking them. Otherwise the onions would be wet in the baked bread. If you ever make this bread, do let me know what you think about the taste of it. :)

Spiced Stout Buns

There are stout, black tea and rum in this bread. I served it warm and the alcohol flavor was so strong! Love it.There are also grounded ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, orange peel, lemon peel and dried raisins in this bread. All resulted in an intense flavor.

I could not find Mackeson Milk Stout and hence have used another stout to replace it. There was rum in this bread because I used dried fruits and peels that I have soaked in rum for months. When I ate the bread cold the alcohol flavor in the fruits was still strong.

For the cross, I used only flour to mix with water this time, but I think that the one having oil, flour and water from Jeffrey Hamelman’s recipe gives better result.

Compared with Hamelman’s hot cross buns, this one has personality, the crumb also has sweetness from the stout, while Hamalman’s has a lot of fruits and is “fluffy” in texture.

Jeffrey Hamelman’s Hot Cross Buns:

http://baobread.wordpress.com/2008/07/10/hot-cross-buns/

Dan Lepard’s another Hot Cross Buns:

http://baobread.wordpress.com/2009/04/13/hot-cross-buns-ii/

Spiced Stout Bun Recipe:

http://www.danlepard.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2799

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