World Bread Day 2012 – Cantonese Salty Rolls (咸卷)

World Bread Day 2012 - 7th edition! Bake loaf of bread on October 16 and blog about it!I was thinking what sourdough I would like to bake to participate in the World Bread Day today, and I finally determined to bake these Salty Rolls (咸卷) instead. Besides Bo Lo Bao and Cocktail Buns, these bread rolls are also one of the several iconic breads in Hong Kong, and you can easily find them in Hong Kong’s local bakeries or Cha Chaan Teng. As the name goes they are more salty and buttery in taste. I’m thinking they are possibly adapted from Western white bread/roll formulas and re-formulated according to our local taste.

They also have other names including 軟豬仔包 (soft piggy rolls?) and 芝麻卷 (sesame rolls). Below is a recipe I learnt from a Cantonese bread class few years back. Have a try and let me know if you like them. Happy World Bread Day! :)

Recipe (makes 6)

Bread flour 200g 100%
Water 130g 65%
Butter 20g 10%
Sugar 10g 5%
Milk powder 6g 3%
Salt 4g 2%
Yeast 3g 1.5%
Egg wash (optional, I have skipped in mine)
White sesames (optional, for sprinkling on top)

1) Mix the ingredients and knead the dough until full gluten development.

2) 1st fermentation until double in size (1-1.5hr)

3) Form into 6 rolls

4) 2nd fermentation until double in size (1hr)

5) Brush the rolls with some water or egg wash, sprinkle the sesame seeds

6) Bake at 180C for 15 mins, serve warm

World Bread Day – Sheng Jian Bao (Pan-Fried Bun, 生煎包)

Bread can be “cooked” in different ways. It can be baked, steamed, grilled, cooked in a tandoor, etc. Do you know it can also be cooked with a pan? Some of you might know pita can be cooked with a frying pan. Below is a Chinese bun which is cooked with a pan too.

Basically it’s a the dough of steamed bun, pan-fried for a minute at the beginning and then added with water to cook the bun. Therefore upper part of the bun tasted like a steamed bun while the bottom is crispy to give a tasteful texture. It’s usually filled with vegetable and minced pork inside.

My oven is broken down (!) and hence I prepared this pan-fried bun to celebrate the World Bread Day 2011. Do you know any other ways to “cook” a bread? :)

Would like to submit it to YeastSpotting too.

Cheers!

RECIPE (MAKES 12)

Adapted from a dim sum class that I took in www.masterwhy.com

Buns

Flour 160g (the chef taught me there’s a kind of flour used for making Chinese buns which the protein is lower than bread flour but higher than cake flour, and not exactly the same as all purpose flour. The common one is in this link. Or you can look for other brands in China town that are used for making buns)

Sugar 16g

Yeast 2g

Baking powder 2g

Water 80g

Filling

Minced pork 80g (the pork is minced with a chopper by myself. Also it’s better to have about 1/4 fat inside which would help the filling taste juicer. The fat should be cut into small dices and mixed to the minced lean pork)

Salt 1/2 tps

Rice wine 1/2 tps 

Pak Choi 80g (cut into dices. Cooked with boiling water for 20 secs. Drained. Wait till cool and use your palms to squeeze out extra water. This helps softening the vegetable and avoids breaking the dough during wrapping)

Sugar 3 tps

Corn starch 2 tps

Water 60g

Others

Spring onions, Toasted sesame seeds (for sprinkling on the buns)

To prepare the buns:

1) Mix all the ingredients until smooth. A window pane test is not required

2) Rest for 20 mins (no need double in size. Just wait until the dough is relaxed)

To prepare the filling:

1) Mix all the ingredients except water and pak choi

2) Add the water slowly in 5 times. After adding the first 1/5 of water, mix the pork mixture and water with a pair of chopsticks in circular motion until the water is absorbed. Continue until all water is added.

It might look too much water at the beginning but it will all be absorbed by the mixture at last.

3) Add the pak choi

4) Place the filling in refrigerator for at least 30mins and the mixture will be firmer

To fill the buns: 

1) Roll the dough into a log and cut into 12pcs

2) Press or roll the small dough into a flat one of 8cm diameter

3) Place 1 tps of filling onto the dough

4) Wrap up the dough (as below video which I found from YouTube)

5) 2nd fermentation is not needed

To pan fry the buns: 

1) Heat a frying pan. Add some oil

2) Place the buns to the pan. Each of them should have 1-2 cm spacing between as the buns would be bigger after cooked

3) Pan fry for 1 min. Bottom should look crispy at this moment

4) Add water to the buns to reach 1/2 of the height of the buns. Wait until the water is boiled

5) Cover with a lid until cooked at medium heat

6) Sprinkle with spring onions and toasted sesame seeds

7) Serve & Enjoy!





Bo Lo Bao (Pineapple Bun, 菠蘿包) – World Bread Day 2010

The most well-known bread of Hong Kong, Bo Lo Bao represents our food culture and how we interprets bread in this city. “Bo Lo” is the Cantonese of pineapple, wheareas “Bao” is bread. This bread features a golden pineapple-like pattern pastry on top, and therefore the name. Is there pineapple inside? No! It’s no surprise the name of Chinese food or dishes sometimes may be a metaphor of something else. The name “Mooncake” is one of the examples.

Bo Lo Bao is a product of “East meets West”. One common story about the origin was people wanted more from traditional western style buns, and hence used sugar, egg, shortening, flour etc and created a pastry for the top. This bread has a crispy top, soft crumb, golden color, enriched flavor and short fermentation time. It exactly tells our preference for a variety of characters in food at a quick speed. Because of the crispy crust and enriched flavor, this bread is also suitable to serve hot or warm. I do appreciate the creativeness and originality of this bread, and I like it when I want something savory. Notwithstanding our culture is used to have soft, warm and savory bread, it is not easy for people to pay more attention to an authentic sourdough. Um, let’s hope time will change this!

This Cantonese bread will go to the World Bread Day. I would also like to submit it to Yeastspotting. Enjoy! :)

Recipe (makes 6)

Sweet buns

Bread flour 200g

Sugar 53g

Instant yeast 8g

Milk powder 13g

Water 100g

Egg 23g

Shortening 23g

Salt 4g

Egg wash

Knead all above and ferment until double in size (about 45 mins). Divide in 6pcs and shape into buns. 2nd fermentation until double in size for about 45 mins

Crust topping

Cake flour 45g

Sugar 25g

Shortening 15g

Butter 3g

Egg 5g

Milk powder 5g

Baking ammonia 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking soda 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking powder 1/8 tp

Mix all of the above and divide into 6 portions. Shape into balls. Afer the 2nd fermentation of the sweet buns, use your palm or a chopper to press the topping into thin round slices. Size would be slightly bigger than the diameter of the dough (refer to photo). Place on the dough and brush with egg wash. Use a toothpick to make crisscrosses on the topping. Bake at 200C for 16-17 mins until the top becomes golden brown. Serve warm.

(Recipe and last photo adapted from the book “Hong Kong Memorable Bakery”/ “回憶的味道-港式老包餅” by 黎力強)

Coffee Coconut Swirl Bread

Finally I have time to make bread, and this bread came up to my mind immediately. Um, it must be one of my favourites. :)

Besides Bo Lo Bao and Cocktail Bun, which are still the two most popular buns in Hong Kong, this bread is also a specialty here. However, it is not easy to find now as I guess not many people like coffee flavoredbakery foods.

Notwithstanding I still think this bread is tasteful and worthwhile to try. The coffee marries with the coconut very well. This bread is also easy to make. It is a white bread dough, plus a filling made of coffee, coconut, butter and sugar.

The white bread recipe is from Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”. It is a soft and tasty dough and I use it as the basic dough for many other breads. The filling is created by myself.

As you see in the photos, the bread is highlighted with a moist filling. So pull apart the swirls with your fingers and enjoy! I’m sure you’ll enjoy the moist and fragrance of the filling with the loaf. :)

White Bread (Adapted from Page43 of Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”

Bread Flour 350g

Salt 7g

Sugar 28g

Powdered Milk 21g

Instant Yeast 3g

Egg 14g

Shortening 28g

Water 203g

Mix, knead & ferment the dough as other common straight doughs. To make the swirl, after 1st fermentation, roll the dough to 8inches x 5inches. Sprinkle & slightly press the filling to the dough. Roll tight & seam. Bake at 180C for 40mins (rotate half way) after 2nd fermentation (I think the bread is a bit dry this time with my oven, I’ll try to bake 5mins less next time).

Filling (mix together)

Unsalted Butter 24g

Egg 24g

Shredded Coconut 48g

Sugar 40g

Instant Coffee Powder 1 1/4 tps (dissolve with few drops of hot water)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 67 other followers

%d bloggers like this: