World Bread Day 2013 — A Quick Garlic Tomato Focaccia

Didn’t post for long! But I’ll not forget to celebrate the World Bread Day every Oct 16 with all bread lovers. <3

Thanks http://www.kochtopf.me for hosting this for the 8th year!! Awesome :)

Here’s my submission — A quick garlic tomato focaccia which is really simple, but colorful and tasty :)

It’s simply an overnight bread dough from my fridge, made into a Focaccia with toppings also from my fridge (cherry tomatoes, garlic, bacon and Pecorino). Bread dough is Richard Bertinet’s Olive Oil Dough recipe. It’s really simple and quick to do but tasteful as the dough has been fermented overnight. My way is to add lots of olive oil on baking tray and top of Focaccia dough before adding toppings, the oil will make the bread really crispy outside and maintain soft inside. Love it! <3

Bread is really simple to make and enjoyable… so make more real bread, eat more real bread. Happy World Bread Day!

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughGarlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughIMG_5387
Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

White Bread for Gathering

Made a white bread for gathering with friends. Recipe is from Peter Reinhart’s famous Bread Baker’s Apprentice. I’ve used a Japanese brand “Nisshin” bread flour which is popular among some local and Taiwanese bread bloggers. The flour is finely milled and hence the bread turns out very soft and silky.  Yummy :)

White Bread (Adapted from Page43 of Peter Reinhart’s “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”)

Bread Flour 350g

Salt 7g

Sugar 28g

Powdered Milk 21g

Instant Yeast 3g

Egg 14g

Shortening 28g

Water 203g

Bake at 180C

World Bread Day – Sheng Jian Bao (Pan-Fried Bun, 生煎包)

Bread can be “cooked” in different ways. It can be baked, steamed, grilled, cooked in a tandoor, etc. Do you know it can also be cooked with a pan? Some of you might know pita can be cooked with a frying pan. Below is a Chinese bun which is cooked with a pan too.

Basically it’s a the dough of steamed bun, pan-fried for a minute at the beginning and then added with water to cook the bun. Therefore upper part of the bun tasted like a steamed bun while the bottom is crispy to give a tasteful texture. It’s usually filled with vegetable and minced pork inside.

My oven is broken down (!) and hence I prepared this pan-fried bun to celebrate the World Bread Day 2011. Do you know any other ways to “cook” a bread? :)

Would like to submit it to YeastSpotting too.

Cheers!

RECIPE (MAKES 12)

Adapted from a dim sum class that I took in www.masterwhy.com

Buns

Flour 160g (the chef taught me there’s a kind of flour used for making Chinese buns which the protein is lower than bread flour but higher than cake flour, and not exactly the same as all purpose flour. The common one is in this link. Or you can look for other brands in China town that are used for making buns)

Sugar 16g

Yeast 2g

Baking powder 2g

Water 80g

Filling

Minced pork 80g (the pork is minced with a chopper by myself. Also it’s better to have about 1/4 fat inside which would help the filling taste juicer. The fat should be cut into small dices and mixed to the minced lean pork)

Salt 1/2 tps

Rice wine 1/2 tps 

Pak Choi 80g (cut into dices. Cooked with boiling water for 20 secs. Drained. Wait till cool and use your palms to squeeze out extra water. This helps softening the vegetable and avoids breaking the dough during wrapping)

Sugar 3 tps

Corn starch 2 tps

Water 60g

Others

Spring onions, Toasted sesame seeds (for sprinkling on the buns)

To prepare the buns:

1) Mix all the ingredients until smooth. A window pane test is not required

2) Rest for 20 mins (no need double in size. Just wait until the dough is relaxed)

To prepare the filling:

1) Mix all the ingredients except water and pak choi

2) Add the water slowly in 5 times. After adding the first 1/5 of water, mix the pork mixture and water with a pair of chopsticks in circular motion until the water is absorbed. Continue until all water is added.

It might look too much water at the beginning but it will all be absorbed by the mixture at last.

3) Add the pak choi

4) Place the filling in refrigerator for at least 30mins and the mixture will be firmer

To fill the buns: 

1) Roll the dough into a log and cut into 12pcs

2) Press or roll the small dough into a flat one of 8cm diameter

3) Place 1 tps of filling onto the dough

4) Wrap up the dough (as below video which I found from YouTube)

5) 2nd fermentation is not needed

To pan fry the buns: 

1) Heat a frying pan. Add some oil

2) Place the buns to the pan. Each of them should have 1-2 cm spacing between as the buns would be bigger after cooked

3) Pan fry for 1 min. Bottom should look crispy at this moment

4) Add water to the buns to reach 1/2 of the height of the buns. Wait until the water is boiled

5) Cover with a lid until cooked at medium heat

6) Sprinkle with spring onions and toasted sesame seeds

7) Serve & Enjoy!





Fruited Tea Loaf


A delicious bread studded with glace cherries, raisins, orange peels, lemon peels mixed with rum. I particularly love the toasted almonds inside which provided more texture and a balance of flavor to the really enriched bread. Did I say the crumb is very tender too? Yum… 

Recipe (2 small loaves)

(Adapted from “Dough: Simple Contemporary Bread” byRichard Bertinet)

i. Mixed fruits (Mix and leave overnight)

  • 75g Glace cherries, quartered
  • 25g mixed orange peels and lemon peels
  • 1 tablespoon rum
  • 75g raisins

ii. Others

  • 63g flaked almonds, slighted toasted
  • Extra flaked almonds for topping
  • Extra egg for egg wash

iii. Dough 

  • 150g full fat milk
  • 8g instant yeast
  • 250g bread flour
  • 30g unsalted butter
  • 20g sugar
  • 5g salt
  • 1 large egg

Prepare as general sweet doughs.

Then mix in the fruits and almonds.

First fermentation: 1 hour

Shape into 2 loaves

Final fermentation: 1.5 hours (until nearly double in size)

Brush with egg wash and topped with almond flakes

Bake: 200C for 25 mins

Mellow Bakers – Chocolate Marble Bread

Hi! This is my contribution to the Mellow Bakers for this month. Originally a Pain de Mie (or Pullman) on Page 243 of Jeffrey Hamelman’s book “Bread: A Baker’s Book of Techniques and Recipes“, I tried something fun — a chocolate marble version.

I used 1/3 of the Pullman bread recipe for this bread. The choco filling is from this website. Very clear step-by-step photos there. I was pretty lazy and didn’t put the choco filling in a plastic bag to fridge it in a choco sheet.. I only spreaded the filling on the dough with a knife. The filling was pretty runny without fridged and it was pretty messy when I twisted the dough … you can imagine the filling sort of squeezed out .. so I didn’t twisted the dough much and there’s not much marble in my bread. Should have prepared the choco sheet~!

The choco filling recipe can be sweeter and smoother for me… still this kind of bread is a hit to my family!!

Join Mellow Bakers! Eat Real Bread! Bake Real Bread!

Almond-Milk Loaf

A Dan Lepard‘s recipe from his classic “The Handmade Loaf“. The bread used almond milk made with sugar, water and skinned almonds as the liquid for the dough. I love the crust so much as it tastes crispy and nutty because of the nut milk. It’s so unique compared with what we normally have on a white loaf. Recommend to try.

My bread – I made it so “square”, haha

Multi-Grain Bread

Weekend is a bread baking day for me. Today I also went to a Wine & Dine Festival, trying some different kinds of red wine and food. To me it’s still not as satisfying as baking a loaf of good bread. This multi-grain bread was baked in the afternoon today. It’s adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman’s Five-Grain Bread. I did not have oats that the recipe required, hence I replaced with whole spelt grains (and changed the name to multi-grain bread as spelt is different from the remained grains, haha). Overall hydration was remained the same.

Although this is a direct dough, this bread is still quite flavorful with the grains. Especially the crumb is really soft like those stored bought sandwitch loaves. :-)

There were larger bursts on 2 slashes in the bread than the other 2, which is probably because I cut the former 2 deeper. Yet it’s still a natural beauty for me. :-)

Adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman’s “Five-Grain Bread” in the book “Bread: A Baker’s Book of Techniques and Recipes

Recipe (makes 1 loaf)

Soaker:

Whole spelt grains 36g

Flaxseeds 36g

Wheat bran 24g

Cornmeal 24g

Water 151g

Mix all the above and leave overnight.

Final Dough:

High gluten flour 151g

Whole-wheat flour 121g

Whole-rye flour 30g

Water 121g

Vegetable oil 15g

Egg 36g

Salt 8.5g (1 1/2t)

Instant yeast 7.5g (3/4t)

Soaker – all of the above

1. Mix the final dough ingredients until the gluten network is fairly well developed

2. Bulk fermentation: 2 hours (or overnight retarding). Fold the dough once after 1 hour

3. Shape the dough

4. Final fermentation : 1 to 1.5 hours at 76F

5. With normal steam, bake at 460F for 40 minutes. The egg and oil may contribute color to the baking loaf quickly, so the oven may need to be lowered by 10 – 20F partway through the bake. Round loaf takes slightly longer than oblong one (mine was 50 minutes)

Bo Lo Bao (Pineapple Bun, 菠蘿包) – World Bread Day 2010

The most well-known bread of Hong Kong, Bo Lo Bao represents our food culture and how we interprets bread in this city. “Bo Lo” is the Cantonese of pineapple, wheareas “Bao” is bread. This bread features a golden pineapple-like pattern pastry on top, and therefore the name. Is there pineapple inside? No! It’s no surprise the name of Chinese food or dishes sometimes may be a metaphor of something else. The name “Mooncake” is one of the examples.

Bo Lo Bao is a product of “East meets West”. One common story about the origin was people wanted more from traditional western style buns, and hence used sugar, egg, shortening, flour etc and created a pastry for the top. This bread has a crispy top, soft crumb, golden color, enriched flavor and short fermentation time. It exactly tells our preference for a variety of characters in food at a quick speed. Because of the crispy crust and enriched flavor, this bread is also suitable to serve hot or warm. I do appreciate the creativeness and originality of this bread, and I like it when I want something savory. Notwithstanding our culture is used to have soft, warm and savory bread, it is not easy for people to pay more attention to an authentic sourdough. Um, let’s hope time will change this!

This Cantonese bread will go to the World Bread Day. I would also like to submit it to Yeastspotting. Enjoy! :)

Recipe (makes 6)

Sweet buns

Bread flour 200g

Sugar 53g

Instant yeast 8g

Milk powder 13g

Water 100g

Egg 23g

Shortening 23g

Salt 4g

Egg wash

Knead all above and ferment until double in size (about 45 mins). Divide in 6pcs and shape into buns. 2nd fermentation until double in size for about 45 mins

Crust topping

Cake flour 45g

Sugar 25g

Shortening 15g

Butter 3g

Egg 5g

Milk powder 5g

Baking ammonia 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking soda 1g (I used approximately 1/5 tp)

Baking powder 1/8 tp

Mix all of the above and divide into 6 portions. Shape into balls. Afer the 2nd fermentation of the sweet buns, use your palm or a chopper to press the topping into thin round slices. Size would be slightly bigger than the diameter of the dough (refer to photo). Place on the dough and brush with egg wash. Use a toothpick to make crisscrosses on the topping. Bake at 200C for 16-17 mins until the top becomes golden brown. Serve warm.

(Recipe and last photo adapted from the book “Hong Kong Memorable Bakery”/ “回憶的味道-港式老包餅” by 黎力強)

Stout, Oat and Honey Rolls

This is a recipe from Dan Lepard again. I love his recipes which are always unique, delicious and easy to make.

Dan has suggested shaping the doughs into knots in the recipe, but I’ve made them into rolls. I roughly followed the below bread site to shape the rolls. It’s in Japanese but has many photos to follow easily.

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/tableroll/tableroll2.htm

http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/e-pan/recipe/recipe.htm

I’ve made half of the recipe which gave 6 bread rolls (80g each).  They were baked at 180C for 18 minutes.

I especially like the unique and strong flavor of the stout in the rolls. The bread is also sweet because of the alcohol and honey. It’s soft and has some bites of the oats as well… :) I will make this again, and would like to submit this post to Susan’s YeastSpotting. Happy baking!

Everything Bread

I don’t have time to bake very often and there are a number of grains and seeds in my kitchen going to expire now. There is also a 2-day old rye sourdough in the fridge. It smelt very sour. Therefore I made this bread in an attempt to clear these stuff, and the result is not bad!

The bread contains a soaker with sesame seeds, rolled oats, linseed, semolina and sunflower seeds. The soaker had a strong semolina flavor but the flavor was not noticable in the bread. Instead the bread has a stronger sesame flavor especially in the crust.

The most interesting thing is the bread is only mildly sour. Maybe I don’t have to throw out a 2-day old sourdough now. The bread is  mildly sweet because of the grains too. I quite enjoyed this bread, especially enjoyed throwing anything I have on hand to the bread and returned with pleasing result. :P

My recipe (600 g bread dough):

100% high gluten flour
20% rye sourdough (2-day old)
90% water (40% for soaking the seeds overnight with some salt added)
2% salt
1% instant yeast
30% seeds (sesame seeds, rolled oats, linseed, semolina, sunflower seeds)

Baked at 230C.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 70 other followers

%d bloggers like this: