Ciabatta with Kamut

Compared with Kamut Levain and Kamut Bread, I like this one the most.

It is in fact Jeffrey Hamelman’s Poolish Ciabatta, but I replaced 30% total flour by kamut (adding to final dough, all poolish was regular flour). I also increased the hydration from 73% to 83%, as water absorption of kamut is higher.

However, apparently 83% hydration was too high and the dough was very slack. Hence instead of folding the dough 2 times (1 time every hour according to original recipe) in the 3-hr bulk fermentation, I folded the dough 4 times in total (1 time every half hour).

Luckily though the dough was wet and kamut’s gluten is low, the crumb is satisfying with all those big and irregular holes. It is less chewy than a regular ciabatta but has a stronger wheat flavor than regular ones. I especially like the mild but unique kamut flavor. Nice. :) The crust is not crispy enough, and I will try to bake the dough longer next time (20mins at 460F this time for 420g dough).

I love this Kamut ciabatta, and have had so much fun playing with Kamut in these few weeks.. :)

Recipe based on: “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman

Kamut Bread

As in last week after making the Kamut Levain, I found that sour and Kamut flavours did not match (or not my taste), I tried to make Kamut bread with pate fermentee this week to see what will happen.

According to Richard Bertinet, the original name of Kamut should be Khorason, hence the recipe I used from his book is called “Khorason Bread”. The amount of Kamut in this recipe is high, and is 1.2 times the bread flour.

As protein level of Kamut is high, its water absorption is also high. The hydration is approximately 74% in the recipe, but the dough is not wet at all, and is similar to regular dough. Since gluten of Kamut is low, I found there was no window pane formed after kneading to the indicated time, and the dough only had moderate gluten development.

I do not like the taste of the bread. Kamut flavor is too strong. Besides a strong “buttery” flavor, I can also feel a strange “tangy” flavor (not sourdough tangy flavor). I think I would prefer a lower proportion of Kamut flour in the bread. Crumb of bread is denser than last sourdough, but there is still moderate chewiness, which is fine for me.

Recipe: “Crust” by Richard Bertinet

Transitional German Style Many Seed Bread

This is the second time I made this bread, and I used spelt flour to replace all the rye flour this time. As the gluten and water absorption of spelt is higher than rye, I added more water than the recipe indicated. I think I have added more water than the dough needed, so the final dough was soft, and the resulted bread crumb was lighter than last time. (Actually I would prefer a tighter crumb as it is called German style bread :P )

On top of the bread were rolled spelt. Though they only had a slight spelt flavor eaten with the bread, they were crunchy and I love this. :) The bread had a light spelt flavor and was quite tasty, but I prefer the rye version.

I like Peter Reinhart’s Whole Grain Bread book, as I always love the strong wheat flavor of whole wheat bread. And the recipes inside allow me to make in just 2 hrs. In this way I can make bread after work (relaxing activity after work!).

Recipe: “Whole Grain Breads” by Peter Reinhart

100% Spelt Bread

I love the whole spelt berries in this bread. They smelt really sweet after soaking in warm water overnight. The bread smelt sweet while baking too. Overall the bread has a sweet and mild nutty taste. I love it.:)

As the dough was weak in gluten, I kneaded it only until “smooth & elastic” (no window pane required) as described in the recipe. However I did’t proof the dough in a tin or basket, so it spreaded after proofing, and the baked bread looks “short”. Anyways, the taste is great.

P.S. If you are in Hong Kong and would like to buy spelt flour & berries, they are available in Great grocery store in Admiralty.

Recipe: “Crust” by Richard Bertinet

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