BBD#21 – Genzano Potato Pizza

Happy 2nd anniversary to Bread Baking Day! I would love to celebrate the big day with this delicious Genzano Potato Pizza.

The theme for WBD is pizza this time. I wanted to try something interesting, and this recipe from Daniel Leader is exactly what I want. The pizza does not have tomato and cheese like general ones. It is thin & crispy, has a deep potato flavor and most importantly a sharp note from the sea salt.  Perfect to enjoy with cold beer ;) .

Something to note is I used King Arthur All Purpose flour instead of high gluten indicated in the recipe. Hence the dough did not have full gluten development as it’s very wet. Also the recipe said the dough should be 1/2 inch thick in the sheet pan, but mine was only 1/4 inch. The recipe didn’t mention the size of the sheet pan. I looked on the web and found mine is a quarter size one (9-1/2 x 13 inch). So I made 1/4 of the recipe. I am not sure if anything was wrong with this. Anyway the pizza is good enough as it is crispy which is how it should be.

The recipe is adapted from Daniel Leader’s “Local Breads”. I found the blog “Hungrig in San Francisco” also posted the recipe, so I am not typing it again.

Now I’m submitting this to BBD#21. Enjoy & Cheers!

Sunflower Seed Rye

Love this! Different from last time, the sunflower seeds were toasted beforehand this time, and definitely has made the bread much nuttier. Couronne shape of the bread has increased the crust to crumb ratio. The rye, toasted seeds and high amount of crust resulted in a strong taste and went very well together, and filled the mouth with a long finish even with a small piece. It really impressed me how the shape of a bread will affect its taste. Yet I still need more practice for better shaping the dough!!

Recipe from Peter Reinhart’s Bread Baker’s Apprentice

Makes 1 pound loave

Firm Starter:

33g 100% hydration levain

38g unbleached high gluten or bread flour

17g water

Mix and ferment at room temp. for 4 hrs, until doubles in size. Then fridge overnight.

Soaker:

80g coarse whole-rye (pumpernickel-grind) flour or rye meal

85g water, at room temperature

Mix and soak at room temperature overnight.

Dough:

78g firm starter (take out  1 hr beforehand to get off the chill)

127g unbleached high-gluten or bread flour

5g salt

2g instant yeast

56g-85g water, lukewarm (90F – 100F)

1/4 cup toasted sunflower seeds

1) Mix the ingredients except the seeds, adding water slowly to adjust the dough consistency. Knead for 4 minutes. Then add the sunflower seeds. Knead for extra 2 minutes until the dough passes window pane test. Avoid over-knead to prevent the dough from turning gummy with rye.

2) Bulk fermentation: 1.5 hrs until doubles in size.

3) Shape into couronne. Final fermentation: 1-1.5 hrs untnil 1.5 times in size.

4) Preheat the oven to 500F. Bake at 450F after steam for 10 minutes. Then lower to 425F and bake until golden brown for extra 15-25 minutes.

5) Cool completely before serving.

Sunflower Seed Levain

I made Daniel Leader’s Sunflower Seed Levain today. It is a pain au levain (70% white flour, 24% whole wheat flour, 6% rye flour, 25% stiff levain, 60% hydration & 2% salt) with 14% sunflower seeds (soaked in 35% water overnight and then drained). The bread is too moist and sour for me. It also hasn’t got the taste of sunflower seeds. I wonder if it is because of my skills or the recipe. I’ll try some more sunflower seed recipes later to find out what’s wrong.

*** Today (the 2nd day) I ate the levain again. Surprisingly it was good and tasted different. It’s less sour and moist and has a nice balance of the tang, wheat and seeds flavors. Now I think it may because the bread was still a bit warm when I ate it yesterday, which enhanced the sourness and moisture. How important “cool down completely” is. Now the bread is much better. I like it.

Kamut Levain

Though both spelt & kamut are acient grains, the flavor of kamut is light instead of being as strong as spelt. It also has a unique flavor that many resources describe as buttery. I cannot think of the best description to the flavor now, but I think there is another flavor besides buttery. Anyway, Kamut’s light flavor is good for summer.

This bread is made of starter, and I think the sour taste has overwhelmed Kamut’s light flavor, even though I did not retard the dough overnight. Hence I would prefer to prepare a less sour levain next time or try baking with pate ferment.

Also, I sprinkled the dough with Kamut instead of plain flour. However the taste is just similar to plain flour even after baking.

Recipe: “Local Breads” by Daniel Leader

Olive Levain

Never thought about it, olives and tangy flavor of the levain are greeeeeeat match! This bread tastes good! (though the crumb of my bread is not as airy as that in the pic of the recipe :P)

Recipe: “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman

Cheese Bread


I like Parmesan cheese, and this bread has a strong flavor of the cheese with 20% of it to the flour. The crumb is moist and delicate with 60% total hydration, 5% olive oil and 18% stiff levain pre-ferment. I didn’t retard the dough but I’m satisfied with the results. Definitely appetizing in this humid and cloudy weather. :)

Recipe: “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman

White Chocolate Chip Bread

This is the milkiest loaf I ever had. The interesting thing is the dough itself doesn’t contain any milk or milk powder, and is in fact a lean dough instead of an enriched one, making it different from regular loaves. It’s the white chocolate chips which give the strong milk flavor, and I like them not sweet eating with the crumb together at all.

The bread makes great toasts. You could see the chocolate chips have formed little holes inside the bread, and when toasted, the little holes would be caramelized outside but lacy inside, producing two different textures and tastes. The fact is I had three pieces in one time. Yum!

Recipe: Real Baking with Rose Levy Beranbaum

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 70 other followers

%d bloggers like this: