World Bread Day 2013 — A Quick Garlic Tomato Focaccia

Didn’t post for long! But I’ll not forget to celebrate the World Bread Day every Oct 16 with all bread lovers. <3

Thanks http://www.kochtopf.me for hosting this for the 8th year!! Awesome :)

Here’s my submission — A quick garlic tomato focaccia which is really simple, but colorful and tasty :)

It’s simply an overnight bread dough from my fridge, made into a Focaccia with toppings also from my fridge (cherry tomatoes, garlic, bacon and Pecorino). Bread dough is Richard Bertinet’s Olive Oil Dough recipe. It’s really simple and quick to do but tasteful as the dough has been fermented overnight. My way is to add lots of olive oil on baking tray and top of Focaccia dough before adding toppings, the oil will make the bread really crispy outside and maintain soft inside. Love it! <3

Bread is really simple to make and enjoyable… so make more real bread, eat more real bread. Happy World Bread Day!

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughGarlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil DoughIMG_5387
Garlic Tomato Focaccia - Richard Bertinet Olive Oil Dough

Country Bread

This is from Jeffrey Hamelman‘s book “Bread“. Nice and clean loaf. I made this loaf with Dove’s Organic Strong White Bread Flour. Actually I’ve made this bread 2 times – the first time was with King Arthur’s Unbleached All Purpose Flour, which looked much flatter with closer crumb (I didn’t even take a photo). I emailed King Arthur and got a reply that the AP flour is softer and hence it’s better to use bread flour when the recipe calls for. I always thought it could be used for bread as there is a baguette recipe behind the bag of the flour. Maybe it depends on how the flour is used in a recipe? I should also have noticed that the dough with the AP was quite loose when I was making it too. There’s still much to practice and learn for my home baking.

Baguette(Mini)

They are from Dan Lepard’s French Bread recipe recently published in the British Baker. An interesting recipe for me which uses three-quarters of the flour to make a ferment for the bread. For the flour I’ve used King Arthur’s Organic All Purpose instead of La Campaillette Des Champs flour.

I have only used 150g water for the final dough, as I couldn’t manage slashes on wet dough well. Overall hydration is 59.2%. The crumb still got some nice holes though the hydration is not high and the preferment is stiff (50% hydration). :-)

My dough had bulk fermentation for 4.5 hours instead of 2-3 hours indicated in the recipe. There were some spots of “irregular aeration” at the 3rd hour, however I was not sure whether that was enough. Hence I just left the dough for longer time. Also I proofed the baguettes seam-side down and they were under-proof because I want to make sure they have good oven spring in the oven.

They are some mini baguettes. Dough was 80g each. Just to fit in my mini-oven. I’ve made a 100% sourdough spelt too. I’ll post it up some time later. It’s nice to end my 3-day holiday with some bread baking. :-)

This will be submitted to the YeastSpotting.

Recipe is here.

 

Barley, Rice and Honey Bread

Played around with Jeffrey Hamalmen’s country bread recipe yesterday. I kept the high amount of preferment as in the recipe (164%), replaced 50% bread flour for final dough by barley flour, and added extra 50% cooked rice. I also added 28% honey. Water was increased to 77% for my desirable dough consistency.

Recipe:

Bread flour 75g 50%
Barley flour* 75g 50%
Preferment (60% hydration) 246g 164%
Cooked Rice 75g 50%
Salt 3g 2%
Water 116g 77%
Honey 42g 28%
Yeast 1/6 t
421%

Baked at 220C for 35mins, left in oven for 5mins after baked

*toasted at 180C for 15mins until lightly colored to enhance the nutty flavor

I love the thick, crunchy and nutty crust which seems to be a characteristic of barley bread. The crumb is sturdy and I will bake it for long time next time  as it was a bit moist. Also I would prefer less honey as the it was too sweet for me.

Not sure if I am on the right track to create a dough like this? Anyway I enjoyed playing with doughs during weekends. :-)

Batard with Spelt

This bread smelt really sweet when taken out from the oven. I am happy that by adding 10%  spelt flour to the pre-ferment and final dough can result with a more delightful bread. Compared with rye and whole wheat, spelt can give a sweeter note to the bread and its wheat flavor is more easy going.

The gluten of spelt is weak, therefore I have only used 10% this time to give it a try. As water absorption of spelt is higher, I increased the hydration to 68%.  This bread is awesome and I will have more bread experiments with spelt soon. I will submit this bread to YeastSpotting. Have fun baking!

 

Recipe (Makes 1 big loaf)

Biga
1/12tp instant yeast
70g bread flour
10g spelt flour
60g water

Mix and leave in the fridge for overnight.

Final dough
220g bread flour
40g spelt flour
1g instant yeast
170g water
6g salt
All of the biga

1)Mix all the ingredients in a bowl, cover and rest for 10 minutes
2)Brush the working table with little olive oil, and knead the dough for 10-15 seconds. Return the dough to the bowl, cover and  rest for another 10 minutes
3)Brush the working table with oil again, and knead for another 10-15 seconds
4)First fermentation for 1.5 hrs (fold the dough once after 45 minutes)
5)Shape into batard, final fermentation for 1.5 hrs
6)Score the dough. Bake with steam at 240C for 10 minutes, then lower the heat to 220C and continue to bake for 30 minutes

Mellow Bakers – Rustic Bread

This is my first contribution to Mellow Bakers. I like this forum where people can share their bread baking results by following recipes from the book “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman.

In this rustic bread, there is 10% rye, 10% wholemeal and 80% bread flour (I used King Arthur All Purpose). Hydration is 69% and the dough was pretty slack. I stopped kneading when it had medium gluten development and gave it 2 folds during the first fermentation instead.

However the dough was still too slack to make a shape except making it into a ciabatta. It spreaded out as well when removing from the couch to the baking tray. As a result the bread was resulted quite flat. I think I should use stronger flour next time!

The bread was baked at 450F for 38mins. Its taste was good with a complex flavor in the crumb and crust. Love it, except my skills in managing the dough strength is yet to be improved!

Update on Dec 11, 2010

I’ve always thought King Arthur’s All Purpose Flour can be used for bread as there was a baguette recipe on the back of its flour bag. Until a month ago I received an email reply from King Arthur as I asked them about the flour, I realized I should really use bread flour suggested in Jeffrey Hamelman’s book instead of AP, as AP is a soft flour. Now I know why my rustic bread turned flat!!

Potato Bread with Roasted Onions

I always want to try new recipe when I have time to bake, but I’ve made this bread from the recipe of Jeffrey Hamelman’s “Bread” for several times now, and highly recommend it. This bread is sooo delectable. It has a very strong roasted flavor, yet is sweet because of the roasted potatoes and caramelized onions. The potatoes have made the crumb tender and the dough less sticky to knead as well. I like the potato skins. They gave a “rugged” look and taste to the bread. I also made the other potato bread without the caramelized onions before, but this one with the onions is unbeatable. The caramel flavor made the bread much much more delicious..

Some notes about preparing the bread — I used Chinese potatoes to make this bread, which gives a stronger potato flavor than Yukon Gold that I have tried before. To prepare the potatoes I diced them with their skin on and baked at 180C until cooked, and then mashed them with a fork. For the onions I did not follow the recipe to bake them, I fried the onions with olive oil at medium heat until they were cameralized instead. The weight of the onions would reduce by almost half when they are done. Hence make sure to prepare double weight of the recipe indicated before cooking them. It is also important to make sure the water in the onions are mostly evaporated when cooking them. Otherwise the onions would be wet in the baked bread. If you ever make this bread, do let me know what you think about the taste of it. :)

Süßes Nussbrot (Sweet Nut Bread)

Love it. Never imagine that rum, hazelnuts and sweetness can be such a  perfect match. Not to mention the bread also has a soft crumb and is packed with lots of hazelnuts …  Great sweet treat.

It’s easy to make – 2-hour sponge plus 1/2 hr first and final fermentations. Yet I think it is better to finish eating on the first day to enjoy a soft crumb because of the short fermentation time.

Thanks Bäcker Süpke for the recipe, also his son for translation! : )

Süßes Nussbrot( Sweet Nut Bread) – Make two 800g loaves

(I modified the steps a bit, since I am not sure of some German/ translations, the bread is fine anyway)

  • The day before:
  • Toast 300g of hazelnuts and chopped into about 8 portions for each (otherwise it’s hard to stick them to the dough as there are many. I skipped the hot water compared with the original recipe)
  • 100g toasted walnut soaked in 50ml of rum
  • Sponge:
  • 300g T55 flour (I used King Arthur)
  • 280ml milk
  • 17g instant dry yeast or 50g fresh yeast
  • Mix and leave for 30-60 mins, until it at least doubles under 24°C (my dough was cold so I left it longer for 2 hrs)
  • Dough:
  • 300g T55 flour
  • All of the sponge
  • 60 g sugar
  • 60 g egg
  • 100 g butter
  • 6 g salt
  • Vanilla (I forgot!)
  • Mix until almost full gluten development. Then mix in the nuts. 1st fermentation for 1/2 hr.
  • Shape the dough . Final fermentation 1/2  hr.
  • Slash the dough. Bake with steam at 180°C. Then lower to 170°C for 45 mins.

Bäcker Süpkes’ Joghurt Brötchen (Yogurt Bread)

I love the taste of multi-grain bread. However it always comes with a dense crumb and I wondered whether there can be one with more opened texture. This bread is the right choice. Thanks Bäcker Süpke for the recipe!

The yoghurt in this bread has created the soft and open crumb. A website said it acts like Vitamin C or absorbic acid to give a boost to the dough. The milk in the yogurt also extends shelf life.

Notwithstanding, the crust is quite hard. Maybe it’s the bread crumbs on the crust and I will skip them next time!

Bäcker Süpkes’ Joghurt Brötchen (Yogurt Bread) (original recipe in German. I have tranlated by Google)

Make 30 small rolls

Soaker:

*70 g cracked rye
* 145 g cracked spelt
* 36 g salt
* 215 ml very hot water

Pore water into the the salt and seeds. Mix, cover and wait for at least 4 hrs.

Sponge:
* 280 g wheat flour 550 (I used King Arthur All Purpose)
* 1 g fresh yeast (I used a pinch of instant yeast)
* 280 ml of cold water

Mix the ingredients. Cover and ferment at room temp. for 2 hrs. Put in fridge for at least 16 hrs.

Dough:
* 890 g flour 550 (I used King Arthur All Purpose)
* 70 g rye flour 997 (I used Dove Whole Grain Rye)
* 75 g sunflower seeds
* 140 g pumpkin seeds
* 75 g sesame seeds
* 75 g flaxseed
* 55 g fresh yeast
* 220 g yoghurt
* 400 ml water

Slightly toast the seeds (can use other kinds of seeds).

(Dan Lepard’s kneading method) Mix all the ingredients, cover and wait for 10 mins. On a slightly oiled surface, knead for 10 secs. Cover and wait for 10 mins. Knead for 10 secs again. Repeat the fermentation and kneading process for 2 more times. Then ferment for around 30 mins until the dough is about double in size.

Cut the dough into squares (about 95g each). Moist the surface with water and roll onto some bread crumbs.

Final fermenation for about 40 mins until almost double in size.

My baking temperature is 220c with steam for 30 mins.

Ciabatta with Kamut

Compared with Kamut Levain and Kamut Bread, I like this one the most.

It is in fact Jeffrey Hamelman’s Poolish Ciabatta, but I replaced 30% total flour by kamut (adding to final dough, all poolish was regular flour). I also increased the hydration from 73% to 83%, as water absorption of kamut is higher.

However, apparently 83% hydration was too high and the dough was very slack. Hence instead of folding the dough 2 times (1 time every hour according to original recipe) in the 3-hr bulk fermentation, I folded the dough 4 times in total (1 time every half hour).

Luckily though the dough was wet and kamut’s gluten is low, the crumb is satisfying with all those big and irregular holes. It is less chewy than a regular ciabatta but has a stronger wheat flavor than regular ones. I especially like the mild but unique kamut flavor. Nice. :) The crust is not crispy enough, and I will try to bake the dough longer next time (20mins at 460F this time for 420g dough).

I love this Kamut ciabatta, and have had so much fun playing with Kamut in these few weeks.. :)

Recipe based on: “Bread” by Jeffrey Hamelman

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