Experiments – Overnight Retardation for Different Sourdoughs

Light Spelt Sourdough with Assorted Nuts and Raisins (Overnight Retarded)

Sourdough making is now even simpler and time saving for me. Recently I’ve been experimenting retarding different sourdoughs overnight and baking the other day, so that I don’t have to wait till weekend and spend half a day in making a bread. I have tried retarding sourdoughs with different flours, amaranth, whole wheat and spelt, which you’ll see in coming posts, I would say that those with amaranth and whole wheat tasted great, but for spelt it seemed its flavor was lost after retarding. They were not as sweet and the spelt flavor was not as strong as spelt sourdoughs I made in the same day. Of course these were my findings from 3 spelt sourdoughs only, but for sure not all breads are suitable for retarding overnight which I read the same from Hamelman’s book from the Levain section. More overnight retardation findings to come, stay tuned. :)

Spelt Sourdough with Chia Seeds (50% spelt, 75% hydration, 3% chia seeds, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough (70% whole wheat, 30% spelt, 75% hydration, overnight retarded)

Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough Crumb

Multi-Grain Bread

Weekend is a bread baking day for me. Today I also went to a Wine & Dine Festival, trying some different kinds of red wine and food. To me it’s still not as satisfying as baking a loaf of good bread. This multi-grain bread was baked in the afternoon today. It’s adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman’s Five-Grain Bread. I did not have oats that the recipe required, hence I replaced with whole spelt grains (and changed the name to multi-grain bread as spelt is different from the remained grains, haha). Overall hydration was remained the same.

Although this is a direct dough, this bread is still quite flavorful with the grains. Especially the crumb is really soft like those stored bought sandwitch loaves. :-)

There were larger bursts on 2 slashes in the bread than the other 2, which is probably because I cut the former 2 deeper. Yet it’s still a natural beauty for me. :-)

Adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman’s “Five-Grain Bread” in the book “Bread: A Baker’s Book of Techniques and Recipes

Recipe (makes 1 loaf)

Soaker:

Whole spelt grains 36g

Flaxseeds 36g

Wheat bran 24g

Cornmeal 24g

Water 151g

Mix all the above and leave overnight.

Final Dough:

High gluten flour 151g

Whole-wheat flour 121g

Whole-rye flour 30g

Water 121g

Vegetable oil 15g

Egg 36g

Salt 8.5g (1 1/2t)

Instant yeast 7.5g (3/4t)

Soaker – all of the above

1. Mix the final dough ingredients until the gluten network is fairly well developed

2. Bulk fermentation: 2 hours (or overnight retarding). Fold the dough once after 1 hour

3. Shape the dough

4. Final fermentation : 1 to 1.5 hours at 76F

5. With normal steam, bake at 460F for 40 minutes. The egg and oil may contribute color to the baking loaf quickly, so the oven may need to be lowered by 10 – 20F partway through the bake. Round loaf takes slightly longer than oblong one (mine was 50 minutes)

100% Spelt Levain

I love the 100% spelt bread that I’ve made according to Richard Bertinet‘s recipe in the book “Crust” before, and this time I’ve made a sourdough version of it. I replaced all the poolish by a liquid sourdough (1:1 spelt to water) and added 25% of walnuts (to all flour) to the dough. Others were remained the same as the recipe.

Proportion of sourdough to final flour was 2:1. The bread was only little sour. Crumb was chewier with the sourdough and I like it. I also like it with walnuts, which go well with the sweet and nutty spelt. Love spelt. I am thinking to make a spelt bread with cheese and walnuts next time. :)

Recipe adapted from: Crust by “Richard Bertinet

Spelt and Walnut Bread

The recipe I used is from Grégoire Michaud‘s Artisan Bread. I love all the irregular holes and purple stains in the crumb which are created by the levain and walnuts. A natural beauty. Agree? :-)

The spelt and walnuts pair very well too. As always I love the taste of spelt, especially the spelt berries taste really sweet after soaking in warm water overnight. A high amount of spelt in bread doesn’t create grassy and bitter tone like whole wheat. This grain should be more pronounced in making whole grain breads.

I baked the dough on the same day instead of refridgerating at 5C for 18hours for bulk fermentation as indicated in the recipe to fit my schedule. I also made it a big loaf instead of small ones, and baked it at 235C at the beginning and then lowered to 210C after the dough gained color. The bread was taken out at 45mins. The thick crunchy crust goes perfect with the nutty flavor of the walnuts and spelt. :)

I really love spelt bread! What about making a 100% sourdough spelt with walnuts for next time? Stay tuned!

Double Espresso Brazil Nut Cake

This is my first post ever on cake. It’s Dan Lepard’s recipe in The Guardian. I love coffee so much and I really like the idea of adding fine grind coffee beans to this cake. The coffee bean I used? It’s Sumatra Mandheling from my french press this week… Heehee. This cake also has 2 other ingredients that I like a lot: spelt and brazil nuts. The brazil nuts pair with the coffee very well. My cake texture seemed a little coarse, maybe I should chop the nuts finer next time? Anyway, I love the taste of this cake. Yum… :-)

I didn’t make cakes for long time and almost forgot some steps. Hope this cake looks fine. Less icing maybe? No idea about icing on a cake at all!

Recipe is from the Guardian website and the link is here 


Batard with Spelt

This bread smelt really sweet when taken out from the oven. I am happy that by adding 10%  spelt flour to the pre-ferment and final dough can result with a more delightful bread. Compared with rye and whole wheat, spelt can give a sweeter note to the bread and its wheat flavor is more easy going.

The gluten of spelt is weak, therefore I have only used 10% this time to give it a try. As water absorption of spelt is higher, I increased the hydration to 68%.  This bread is awesome and I will have more bread experiments with spelt soon. I will submit this bread to YeastSpotting. Have fun baking!

 

Recipe (Makes 1 big loaf)

Biga
1/12tp instant yeast
70g bread flour
10g spelt flour
60g water

Mix and leave in the fridge for overnight.

Final dough
220g bread flour
40g spelt flour
1g instant yeast
170g water
6g salt
All of the biga

1)Mix all the ingredients in a bowl, cover and rest for 10 minutes
2)Brush the working table with little olive oil, and knead the dough for 10-15 seconds. Return the dough to the bowl, cover and  rest for another 10 minutes
3)Brush the working table with oil again, and knead for another 10-15 seconds
4)First fermentation for 1.5 hrs (fold the dough once after 45 minutes)
5)Shape into batard, final fermentation for 1.5 hrs
6)Score the dough. Bake with steam at 240C for 10 minutes, then lower the heat to 220C and continue to bake for 30 minutes

Bäcker Süpkes’ Joghurt Brötchen (Yogurt Bread)

I love the taste of multi-grain bread. However it always comes with a dense crumb and I wondered whether there can be one with more opened texture. This bread is the right choice. Thanks Bäcker Süpke for the recipe!

The yoghurt in this bread has created the soft and open crumb. A website said it acts like Vitamin C or absorbic acid to give a boost to the dough. The milk in the yogurt also extends shelf life.

Notwithstanding, the crust is quite hard. Maybe it’s the bread crumbs on the crust and I will skip them next time!

Bäcker Süpkes’ Joghurt Brötchen (Yogurt Bread) (original recipe in German. I have tranlated by Google)

Make 30 small rolls

Soaker:

*70 g cracked rye
* 145 g cracked spelt
* 36 g salt
* 215 ml very hot water

Pore water into the the salt and seeds. Mix, cover and wait for at least 4 hrs.

Sponge:
* 280 g wheat flour 550 (I used King Arthur All Purpose)
* 1 g fresh yeast (I used a pinch of instant yeast)
* 280 ml of cold water

Mix the ingredients. Cover and ferment at room temp. for 2 hrs. Put in fridge for at least 16 hrs.

Dough:
* 890 g flour 550 (I used King Arthur All Purpose)
* 70 g rye flour 997 (I used Dove Whole Grain Rye)
* 75 g sunflower seeds
* 140 g pumpkin seeds
* 75 g sesame seeds
* 75 g flaxseed
* 55 g fresh yeast
* 220 g yoghurt
* 400 ml water

Slightly toast the seeds (can use other kinds of seeds).

(Dan Lepard’s kneading method) Mix all the ingredients, cover and wait for 10 mins. On a slightly oiled surface, knead for 10 secs. Cover and wait for 10 mins. Knead for 10 secs again. Repeat the fermentation and kneading process for 2 more times. Then ferment for around 30 mins until the dough is about double in size.

Cut the dough into squares (about 95g each). Moist the surface with water and roll onto some bread crumbs.

Final fermenation for about 40 mins until almost double in size.

My baking temperature is 220c with steam for 30 mins.

Transitional German Style Many Seed Bread

This is the second time I made this bread, and I used spelt flour to replace all the rye flour this time. As the gluten and water absorption of spelt is higher than rye, I added more water than the recipe indicated. I think I have added more water than the dough needed, so the final dough was soft, and the resulted bread crumb was lighter than last time. (Actually I would prefer a tighter crumb as it is called German style bread :P )

On top of the bread were rolled spelt. Though they only had a slight spelt flavor eaten with the bread, they were crunchy and I love this. :) The bread had a light spelt flavor and was quite tasty, but I prefer the rye version.

I like Peter Reinhart’s Whole Grain Bread book, as I always love the strong wheat flavor of whole wheat bread. And the recipes inside allow me to make in just 2 hrs. In this way I can make bread after work (relaxing activity after work!).

Recipe: “Whole Grain Breads” by Peter Reinhart

100% Spelt Bread

I love the whole spelt berries in this bread. They smelt really sweet after soaking in warm water overnight. The bread smelt sweet while baking too. Overall the bread has a sweet and mild nutty taste. I love it.:)

As the dough was weak in gluten, I kneaded it only until “smooth & elastic” (no window pane required) as described in the recipe. However I did’t proof the dough in a tin or basket, so it spreaded after proofing, and the baked bread looks “short”. Anyways, the taste is great.

P.S. If you are in Hong Kong and would like to buy spelt flour & berries, they are available in Great grocery store in Admiralty.

Recipe: “Crust” by Richard Bertinet

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